DECISIONS, DECISIONS

I’ve been working on publishing my second novel and am finally ready. Yay! I had such good luck using Sable Books as the publisher of Terror’s Identity, I was planning to use them again. But, they’re doing so well, the start time was more than I wanted to wait. I know. I know. After waiting all this time, what’s my rush? People who see me at the New Farmers’ Market ask when my next novel is due out. And I’ve been saying “soon,” but that’s wearing thin.

 

So, with the help of my critique partners, I think I’ve got Emily’s Ride to Courage as close to perfection as possible, though I’m sure there will still be errors in it. Which is why I’m having a copy edit added as part of the cost.

 

I have chosen CreateSpace to do this book. I’ve seen good results as far as the quality of the work they’ve produced and, so far, they seem to be easy to deal with. Like sending your first child off for his first solo walk around the block, it’s hard to let go. But the only way to have your child, or your book, grow is to cautiously release it to a wider circle of love. You may shed a few tears and your hand may feel empty, but soon its acceptance in the world will make your heart sing.

 

CreateSpace is yet another Amazon company, of course. Isn’t the whole world an Amazon company? But it seems to be set up as a stand-alone Amazon entity. The corporate ties make it easier to keep the prices lower than independent companies such as Sable Books. This bothers me a bit, because “big box” stores drive out small company competitors. Just look at the collapse of “Main Street America,” which was done in by shopping malls, which were done in by online shopping. For future books I intend to give myself more lead time and go back to Sable Books. Or a combination of Sable Books and CreateSpace, because CreateSpace has more marketing outlets available.

 

Whatever avenue you choose to publish your book, please make sure you take every effort to produce a book that is a joy to read and won’t have the reader constantly stumbling over poor writing and poor editing. But do pat yourself on the back for having reached your goal.

 

The main horse in the story is a “blood bay” with four white legs and four white hooves. My husband always wanted a bay horse and this story came to me because we had to put down a young horse with four white hooves. The day after that I was cleaning our house as part of my grief therapy and Grandpa’s voice came into my head: “Won’t have me no white hooved horse. One white hoof, maybe, but never no four while hooves. They’s weak.” Well what was I going to do with that? Since I write for children, I had to come up with a child as the protagonist—enter Emily. And then of course, I had to add all kinds of wrinkles to the story. Enter Emily being away from her family, and her sister being obnoxious and a bully. Next came Mom being deployed to Afghanistan and disappearing and Dad being on the road too much for the girls to stay with him. Then we have Grandpa’s insisting Emily study math over the summer, and Emily being afraid to make new friends. Emily is worried about riding a horse she doesn’t know. Every possibly perfect horse she and Grandpa go to see as a prospective match shows one of Gemini’s potential problems—a problem Gemini doesn’t show. In the end, Emily solves all her woes, including proving Gemini to be the perfect horse for her.

 

A friend found the perfect picture of a bay horse with four white hooves to use on the cover of my book, but I cannot find out where to get permission to use it.

 

So, make sure you have all your legal issues squared away, like copyrighting your book. I paid $800 to get the official government copyright for Terror’s Identity, but more and more authors are betting on the come that they won’t need to sue anybody over infringements, so I decided not to jump through that hurdle this time.

 

If you’re young and just starting out on this journey, try the trade publishing route, but if you don’t want to go through the heart-aches of rejections, try the self-publishing route. Just remember to not take any shortcuts. Have your manuscript glistening not only in your eye, but those of critique members and professional editors.

 

No matter how you go about publishing you book, good luck with your endeavor and let me know when it’s in print.